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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Aaron Maté
Democracy NOW Producer
LINKTV 05/20/2014
Maté: A new report reveals The National Security Agency is recording every single phone call made in the Bahamas, even though the U.S. has said the Caribbean nation poses little to no threat to Americans. The story is based on documents leaked by Edward Snowden that describe a classified program called SOMALGET that was put in place by the NSA without the knowledge or consent of the Bahamian government. Instead, the website Intercept reports the agency seems to have obtained access through the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. One NSA document says the over purposeful recording calls in the Bahamas is “for legitimate commercial service.” But the same document adds “our covert mission is the provision of SIGINT” or signal intelligence. Goodman: Documents released by Snowden show the system is part of a broader program known as Mystic.
Aaron Maté
Democracy NOW Producer
LINKTV 05/20/2014
Maté: Our story details the NSA program called Mystic, first detailed in a Washington Post story. Mystic was developed by the NSA in 2009. It’s variously sponsored through a number of subprograms which are controlled by the NSA's commercial solution center. This is the NSA wing that works with the NSA’s secret corporate partners. As you know the NSA wouldn’t be able to function if it wasn’t for the corporate partners that it relies on to gain access to communications networks in various countries. It‘s also co-sponsored by the CIA, Central Intelligence Agency and the Drug Enforcement Administration, The DEA. So as you mentioned, this program has gained access in Mexico, Kenya, the Philippines, the Bahamas, and one of the country that The Intercept is not naming at this time.
Brian Ross
Chief Investigative Reporter ABC News
LINKTV 08/29/2014
Maté: It’s been over a year since Edward Snowden exposed mass surveillance by the NSA. Now comes the most comprehensive look to date at how unchecked government spying is impacting two fields we all rely on to curb abuses of power and defend basic rights. The results are chilling. In a new report, Human Rights Watch and The American Civil Liberties Union, warn "large-scale surveillance is seriously hampering U.S. based journalists and lawyers in their work." The report is based on interviews with dozens of reporters and lawyers. This is Brian Ross, chief investigative correspondent for ABC News. Ross: We sometimes feel, or I feel at least, like you’re operating like somebody in the mafia. Gotta go around with a bag full of quarters, and if you can find a pay phone, use it. Or use like drug dealers use, throw away burner phones. These are all then steps to take to get rid of an electronic trail. To have to take those kind of steps, makes journalists feel like we’re criminals, like we’re doing something wrong, and I don’t think we are. I think we’re providing a useful service to Americans to know what’s going on in their government and what’s happening.
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